Georgia; The Cost Of Gun Cotnrol

Continuing the second “Cost of Gun Control” series with Georgia, the next State in alphabetical order, Delaware, we will again see the State fit the profile of a gun control venue as the key dates and rates are noted.

As usual with this series, all crime numbers mentioned here are from the FBI Uniform Crime Report,either from the printed or internet editions, available at many police headquarters, or from this convenient spreadsheet maintaned by the disaster center.

There are multiple objectives in this series, the primary one being to demonstrate that the universal increase in all forms of crime when restrictive gun laws cannot be a result of coincidence. Since each State has different income levels as well as different demographics, the probability that crime rates will rise and fall in lockstep immediately after imposing or repealing a restrictive gun law are extremely remote. When you have hundreds of such “coincidences” crediting other factors than gun control becomes statistically impossible. A subject we will return to after we look at Colorado’s gun laws and crime numbers.

Georgia is one of America’s less affluent States, ranking 333rd with a mean income of more ust under $50,000.

Demographically, Georgia has three times the national avere of our most violent demographic, and 69.5 percent population groups with quite low violent crime rates. Something to keep in mind when we look at the crime rates.

Fortunately, Georgia has fairly informed gun laws, which help keep the violent crime rates well down, with 2015’s violent crime rate at slightly below the national average at 378.3 and the homicide rete at 6.0, both per 100,000 population.

For a quick comparison, the Peach State has four times the population of Chicago,and about 75 percent of the crime.

Georgia, with a much lower percentage of migrants from the Northeast and Central and South American,

With that, it is time to look at how the violent crime rates increase with Hollywood’s gun control campaign and Federal gun control laws.

The key dates and violent crime numbers

1960, the 27th year of a long term decline in crime following the repeal of Prohibition, when the violent when the Peach State Law Enforcement Agencies (LEA’s) reported a total of 6,282 violent crimes in 1960 to the FBI.

1963,the year the entertainment industry began a nationwide gun ban campaign;when Georga LEA’s 7.019 violent crimes to the FBI.

1964,the first full year of Hollywood’s gun ban campaign, when Georgia LEA’s reported 8,285 violent crimes to the FBI.

1968, the fifth full year of Hollywood’s gun ban campaign, and the year the Federal Gun Control Act of 1968 was imposed and Florida’s Law Enforcement Agencies (LEAs) reported 9,908 violent crimes to the FBI.

1969, the first full year of Federal gun controls Georgia EA’s reported 11,235 violent crimes to the FBI:

1973, the fifth full year of Federal gun controls, which saw Georgia agencies report 19,738 violent crimes to the FBI.

19993 the yar Handgun Control’s “Assault Weapons Ban was signed into law, when Georgia Law Enforcement Agencies reported 50,019 violent crimes to the FBI

As you can see from the dates and numbers of violent crimes, every time a “gun control” l campaign came along, or restrictions on firearms were imposed, Georgia’s violentcrime numbers and rates increase, with an 833 percent increase in violent crime rates in just 30 year.

In that year, Florida gun buyers began to purchase defensive

At this point, let me also point let me mention that before the entertainment industry’s gon ban campaign, the percentage of firearms facilitated violent crime was below 50% with guns being used in 46.1 percent of homicides in 1959. While the rate gun use increasing as restrictions are placed in the law abiding’s possession and transport of firearms.

The 2015 FBI Uniform Crime Report shows Georginas suffered 585 murders, with 464 of those firearms related, for a 78.5 percent firearms homicide rate. As you will see as we continue the series, a sharply increased percentage of gun related crimes is typical of gun control legislation.

With that, here is the chart documenting the increase in violent crime rates resulting from gun control legislation:

As you can see, Floridians are far less likely to become a victim of a criminal than they have been since the 1940’s.

However, while the murder rate is the smallest of the four categories of violent crime, it is the one gun ban activists use for shock effect. SO here is a chart of Georgia’sh omicide rate from 1960 to 2015, showing murder rates lso rise and fall in lockstep with gun control activity.

Please note That since Gergia’s population more than doubled, from 55,480,000in 1981 to 10,250,000 in 2015, these numbers indicate a sharp decline in the homicide rate beween the two years:

As you can see in the chart and verify at the link in the first paragraphs, Concealed Carry and Open Carry have put a lid on Florida’s homicide rate.

While there are differences, most due to the strictness of the individual laws as well as the level of enforcement; as well as demographics and economics, those differences are generally far less than the difference between no gun control and gun control.

Why can we be sure Florida’s violent crime rates rise in lockstep with multi State gun control campaigns and federal gun laws and not something else?

The investigators saying has it that “When everything else has been disproven, what remains must be true.” Literally everything, from electric lighting to leaded gasoline to color television to video games has been blamed for rising violent crime rates.

Violent television programming and the rise of drug and human trafficking to be minor causative factors in the prevalence of violent crime, but gun control is the primary triggering factor.

We have gotten to the point where the probability that gun control caused all the crime increases noted so far in this series that we have moved past most named numbers.

At present, the probability is approximately 1 in 13.4*10^700, or nine orders of magnitude grater tan the estimated number of sub-atomic particles in this universe. Meaning it is conceivable, but you could count grains of sand for the 13.5 year estimated age of the universe with making more than a dent in the sand pile.

Obviously, Georgia has paid a terrible price for its failed experiment in gun control, beginning with $2,200,000 for each excess homicide, the cost of medial treatment resulting from gun control at a mean cost of $36,000 for each extra person shot or cut, the cost of disability and continuing medical care, the cost of goods disappeared, damaged or stolen, as well as the cost of extra security, added law enforcement,prosecution,prisons,and probation and parole.

The estimated cost of Georgia’s ‘s Federal gun control experiment is a staggering $134,000,000,000 over 54 years, and climbing by the second. That is far too high a price for a nation to pay for a series of laws that only make matters worse.

It is time for Congress to do wht it is paid to do,and preempt all State and Federal gun laws that exceed current Federal gun restrictions, i institute a study of existing gun laws and forbid any laws modeled on failed gun laws; as well as impose a reasonable fine,at least $100,000 a day,on those who attempt to enforce preempted gun laws,or to craft new laws to evade Federal preemption.

Lives are too valuable to waste just because someone things getting on the public payroll paints a target on his back.

Stranger

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Florida: The Cost Of Gun Control

Continuing the second “Cost of Gun Control” series with Florida, the next State in alphabetical order, Delaware, we will again see the State fit the profile of a gun control venue as the key dates and rates are noted.

As usual with this series, all crime numbers mentioned here are from the FBI Uniform Crime Report,either from the printed or internet editions, available at many police headquarters, or from this convenient spreadsheet maintaned by the disaster center.

There are multiple objectives in this series, the primary one being to demonstrate that the universal increase in all forms of crime when restrictive gun laws cannot be a result of coincidence. Since each State has different income levels as well as different demographics, the probability that crime rates will rise and fall in lockstep immediately after imposing or repealing a restrictive gun law are extremely remote. When you have hundreds of such “coincidences” crediting other factors than gun control becomes statistically impossible. A subject we will return to after we look at Colorado’s gun laws and crime numbers.

Florida is one of America’s less affluent States, ranking 38th with a mean income of more than $$47,463.

Demographically, Florida has a higher than average percentage of our most violent demographic, a relatively high percentage of residents have dropped out of the job market, and and as you would expect from those numbers, crime rates are somewhat higher than the American mean.

Florida is one of those States with a relatively high number of gun laws such as the law agianst possession of a Winchester rifle, that were seldom, if ever, enforced. As such, they made very little contribution to Florida’s crime rate. More significant were laws against carry, and of coruse Marion Hammer’s 1987 License To Carry system, which drastically reduced all forms of violent crime.

In fact, as with every other jurisdiction, crime rates in cirmes per 100,000 persons population have closely tracked the key dates and percentage of increase that other States, and nations, have experienced simiar restrictions on guns.

The key dates and violent crime numbers

1960, the 27th year of a long term decline in crime following the repeal of Prohibition, when the violent Nutmeg State Police reported 11,376 violent crimes to the FBI.

1963,the year the entertainment industry began a nationwide gun ban campaign;when Florida Police reported 12,150 violent crimes to the FBI.

1964,the first full year of Hollywood’s gun ban campaign, when Florida Police reported 16,539 1 sch crimes t the FBI.

1968, the full year of Hollywood’s gun ban campaign, and the year the Federal Gun Control Act of 1968 was imposed and Florida’s Law Enforcement Agencies (LEAs) reported 27,913
violent crimes to the FBI.

1969, the first full year of Federal gun controls Florida EA’s reported 33,824 violent crimes to the FBI:

1973, the fifth full year of Federal gun controls, which saw Florida agencies report 46,419 violent crimes to the FBI.

19901 the peak year for violent crime in Florida, with Handgun Control Inc.’s “Assault weapons Ban Campaign at its most intense. That year, Florida’s LEA’s reported a staggering total of 164,975 violent crimes reported to them, and then reported to the FBI.

In that year, Florida gun buyers began to purchase defensive firearms such Sport Utility Rifles and handguns, a few violent criminals were shot, and violent crime began the long fall that has cut violent crime rates from 1,207.2 per 100,000 to 461.9 per 100,000 in 2015, a 60 percent decline in violent crime that a reasonable Concealed Carry Weapons system and relaxed gun laws are entirely responsible for.

At this point, let me point let me mention that Florida does not report the number of gun related murders,. However, the FBI does list murder rates, which were 10.6 per 100,000 in 1960, and a 5.1 per 100,000 population in 2015, a 54 percent decline in murder; thanks to concealed carry and relaxed gun laws:

With that, here is the chart documenting the increase in violent crime rates resulting from gun control legislation:

As you can see, Floridians are far less likely to become a victim of a criminal than they have been since the 1940’s.

However, while the murder rate is the smallest of the four categories of violent crime, it is the one gun ban activists use for shock effect. SO here is a chart of Florida’s homicide rate from 1960 to 2015,the latest year data is currently available:

As you can see in the chart and verify at the link in the first paragraphs, Concealed Carry and Open Carry have put a lid on Florida’s homicide rate.

While there are differences, most due to the strictness of the individual laws as well as the level of enforcement; as well as demographics and economics, those differences are generally far less than the difference between no gun control and gun control.

Why can we be sure Florida’s violent crime rates rise in lockstep with multi State gun control campaigns and federal gun laws and not something else? The investigators saying has it that “When everything else has been disproven, what remains must be true.” Literally everything, from electric lighting to leaded gasoline to color television to video games has been blamed for rising violent crime rates.

Violent television programming and the rise of drug and human trafficking to be minor causative factors in the prevalence of violent crime, but gun control is the primary triggering factor.

We have gotten to the point where the probability that gun control caused all the crime increases noted so far in this series that we have moved past most named numbers.

At present, the probability is approximately 1 in 12.8*10^691, or four orders of magnitude grater tan the estimated number of sub-atomic particles in this universe. Meaning it is conceivable, but you could count grains of sand for the 13.5 year estimated age of the universe with making more than a dent in the sand pile.

Obviously, Florida has paid a terrible price for its failed experiment in gun control, beginning with $2,200,000 for each excess homicide, the cost of medial treatment resulting from gun control at a mean cost of $36,000 for each extra person shot or cut, the cost of disability and continuing medical care, the cost of goods disappeared, damaged or stolen, as well as the cost of extra security, added law enforcement,prosecution,prisons,and probation and parole.

The estimated cost of Delaware’s gun control experiment is a staggering $1292,000,000,000 9two hundred ninety two billion, dollars,over 54 years, and climbing by the second. That is far too high a price for a nation to pay for a series of laws that only make matters worse.

It is time for Congress to do wht it is paid to do,and preempt all State and Federal gun laws that exceed current Federal gun restrictions, i institute a study of existing gun laws and forbid any laws modeled on failed gun laws; as well as impose a reasonable fine,at least $100,000 a day,on those who attempt to enforce preempted gun laws,or to craft new laws to evade Federal preemption.

Lives are too valuable to waste just because someone things getting on the public payroll paints a target on his back.

Stranger

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Delaware: The Cost Of Gun Control

Continuing the second “Cost of Gun Control” series with the next State in alphabetical order, Delaware, we will again see the State fit the profile of a gun control venue as the key dates and rates are noted.

As usual with this series, all crime numbers mentioned here are from the FBI Uniform Crime Report,either from the printed or internet editions, or confirmed at this convenient spreadsheet, maintained by the Disaster Center.

There are multiple objectives in this series, the primary one being to demonstrate that the universal increase in all forms of crime when restrictive gun laws cannot be a result of coincidence. Since each State has different income levels as well as different demographics, the probability that crime rates will rise and fall in lockstep immediately after imposing or repealing a restrictive gun law are extremely remote. When you have hundreds of such “coincidences” crediting other factors than gun control becomes statistically impossible. A subject we will return to after we look at Colorado’s gun laws and crime numbers.

Delaware is one of America’s more affluent States, ranking 14th with a mean income of more than $59,700 Demographically, Delaware has a higher than average percentage of our most violent demographic, a relatively high percentage of residents have dropped out of the job market, and and as you would expect from those numbers, crime rates are somewhat higher than the American mean.

Crime rate have closely tracked the key dates that have sent crime rates soaring in other States.

The key dates and violent crime numbers are:

1960, the 27th year of a long term decline in crime following the repeal of Prohibition Prohibition when the Blue Hen Sttae Police reported just 375 violent crimes to the FBI.

1963,the year the entertainment industry began a nationwide gun ban campaign;when Delaware Police reported 424 violent crimes to the FBI.

1964,the first full year of Hollywood’s gun ban campaign, when Delaware police reported 541 sch crimes t the FBI.

1968, the full year of Hollywood’s gun ban campaign, and the year the Federal Gun Control Act of 1968 was imposed and Delaware’s Law Enforcement Agencies (LEAs) reported 3,825 violent crimes to the FBI.

1969, the first full year of Federal gun controls Delaware’s LEA’s reported 948 5 violent crimes to the FBI:

1973, the fifth full year of Federal gun controls, which saw Delaware’s agencies report 2,018 violent crimes to the FBI.

19901 the peak year for violent crime in Delaware, with Handgun Control Inc.’s “Assault weapons Ban Campaign at its most intense, and Delaware’s residents realized there was a real threat of shutting down gun makers, and began guying defensive weapons such as the Sport Utility Rifles HCI wanted to ban, and handguns. That year Delaware Law Enforcement agencies reported 4,857 violent crimes to the FBI.

1999,when a second peak in violent and property crime occurred resulting from a local gun ban campaign, and the spread of drug trafficking, resulting in Delaware LEA’s reporting 5,672 violent crimes to the FBI.

You can confirm these numbers at the link in the second paragraph of this essay, or by consulting the FBI Uniform Crime Report, which many Police Departments maintain at their headquarters.

As you can see from the chart below, violent crime rates rose from 375 in 1960 to 4,720 viollent crimes reported by the Police in 2015. a more than 1200% increase.

At this point, let me point let me mention another of the myriad benefits of gun control, far higher percentages of violent crimes committed with firarms. In 1960 Delaware LEA’s reported 33 murders to the FBI, with 15, 45.5 percent firearms related. In 2015 the number of murders had grown to 63, with 52, or 82.5% firearms related.

With that, here is the chart documenting the increase in violent crime rates resulting from gun control legislation:

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As you can see, Delaware’s post-1960 history closely tracks the experience of all 50 States, the District of Columbia, and of every country on Earth with restrictive gun laws.

While there are differences, most due to the strictness of the individual laws as well as the level of enforcement; as well as demographics and economics, those differences are generally far less than the difference between no gun control and gun control.

Wht is the probability that this increase in Delaware’s violent crime rates rises in lockstep with gun control campaigns and not something else? The investigators saying has it that “When everywhere else has been disproven, what remains must be true.” Literally everything, from electric lighting to leaded gasoline to color television to video games has been blamed for rising violent crime rates.

Violent television programming and the rise of drug and human trafficking to be minor causitive factors in the prevalence of violent crime, but gun control is the primary triggering factor.

We have gotten to the point where the probability that gun control caused all the crime increases noted so far in this series that we have moved past most named numbers. At present, the probability is approximately 1 in 13.2*10^84, or two orders of magnitude grater tan the estimated number of sub-atomic particles in this universe. Meaning it is conceivable, but you could count grains of sand for the 13.5 year estimated age of the universe with making more than a dent in the sand pile.

Obviously, Delaware has paid a terrible price for its failed experiment in gun control, beginning with $2,200,000,000 for each excess homicide, the cost of medial treatment resulting from gun control at a mean cost of $36,000 for each extra person shot or cut, the cost of disability and continuing medical care, the cost of goods disappeared, damaged or stolen, as well as the cost of extra security, added law enforcement,prosecution,prisons,and probation and parole.

The estimated cost of Delaware’s gun control experiment is a staggering $16,400,000,000 over 51 years, and climbing by the second. That is far too high a price for a nation to pay for a series of laws that only make matters worse.

It is time for Congress to do wht it is paid to do,and preempt all State and Federal gun laws that exceed current Federal gun restrictions, i institute a study of existing gun laws and forbid any laws modeled on failed gun laws; as well as impose a reasonable fine,at least $100,000 a day,on those who attempt to enforce preempted gun laws,or to craft new laws to evade Federal preemption.

Lives are too valuable to waste just because someone thinks it would be a good idea.

Stranger

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Connecticut: The Cost Of Gun Cotnrol

Continuing the second “Cost of Gun Control” series with the next State in alphabetical order, Connecticut, we will again see the State fit the profile of a gun control venue as the key dates and rates are noted.

As usual with this series, all crime numbers mentioned here are from the FBI Uniform Crime Report,either from the printed or internet editions,or from this spreadsheet, maintained by the Disaster Center.

There are multiple objectives in this series, the primary one being to demonstrate that the universal increase in all forms of crime when restrictive gun laws cannot be a result of coincidence. Since each State has different income levels as well as different demographics, the probability that crime rates will rise and fall in lockstep immediately after imposing or repealing a restrictive gun law are extremely remote. When you have hundreds of such “coincidences” crediting other factors than gun control becomes statistically impossible. A subject we will return to after we look at Colorado’s gun laws and crime numbers.

Connecticut is one of America’s most affluent States, ranking fourth with a mean income of more than $70,000 a year. As you would expect from that number, overall crime rates are far lower than the national average, since high earners seldom resort to violence or other forms of crime. Still, Connecticut was once had var lower crime rates and totals than the State has now.

Crime rate have closely tracked the key dates that have sent crime rates soaring in other States.

The key dates and violent crime numbers are:

1960, the 27th year of a long term decline in crime following the repeal of Prohibition when the violent Nutmeg State Police reported just 928 violent crimes to the FBI.

1963,the year the entertainment industry began a nationwide gun ban campaign;when Connecticut Police reported 1,192 violent crimes to the FBI.

1964,the first full year of Hollywood’s gun ban campaign, when Connecticut police repaorted 1,773 sch crimes t the FBI.

1968, the full year of Hollywood’s gun ban campaign, and the year the Federal Gun Control Act of 1968 was imposed and Connecticut’s Law Enforcement Agencies (LEAs) reported 3,825 violent crimes to the FBI.

1969, the first full year of Federal gun controls Connecticut LEA’s reported 4,415 violent crimes to the FBI:

1973, the fifth full year of Federal gun controls, which saw Connecticut agencies report 6,421 violent crimes to the FBI.

1990, the peak year for violent crime in Connecticut, with Handgun Control Inc’s “Assault weapons Ban Campaign at its most intense, Connecticut authorities reported 10.2-` violent crimes to the FBI.

You can confirm these numbers at the link in the second paragraph of this essay, or by consulting the FBI Uniform Crime Report, which many Police Departments maintain at their headquarters.

As you can see from the chart below, violent crime rates rose in 204, 2015, and from preliminary numbers, in 2016 as a result of new gun restrictions imposed in 2013.

At this point, let me point out that in 1960 only 46.5 percent of Connecticut’s homicides were gun related, but by 1968 69.6 percent of the State’s homicides were gun related. For 2015,the latest year official data is available, Connecticut LEAs reported 107 murders, of which 73 or 68.3%, of murders were firearm related.

Let me also not that Connecticut shares with Colorado and other States that the names and addresses of murder victims total more substantially more than the official body count.

With that, here is the chart documenting the increase in violent crime rates resulting from gun control legislation:

AS you can see, for the first 13 years of the chart tracking violent crime from 1950,Connecticut’s violent crime rates were in a slow decline that began in 1933. From the inception of the entertainment in1933, at the end of Prohibition.

And why is there a decline in the violent crime in 2014? Let’s look t anther chart, this wone with the number of “aggravated assaults” in red and robberies in blue:

IT seems young people would rather st at home and play MMORG Games than get out and fight over a young lady’s attentions at the manly art of beating the stew of of a rival.

Of course, homicide is a part of violent crime: and Colorado’s homicide rates also reflect the low preponderance of low violence demographic groups:

And for completeness,here is how Connecticut’s homicide rate reacted to the restrictive laws called “gun control:”

It should be obvious that both State and Federal gun controls have driven up Connecticut’s violent crime rates. Despite the wild claims of gun control such as current governor “Gun Ban” Malloy crime is not down, it is up. No one is safer, they are at more risk of being criminally victimized. Therefore, Connecticut’s vaunted gun controls are a failure,as are the Federal laws that also apply to the Nutmeg State.

What is the probability that these, and the rise and fall in the other States covered so far in this series “happened by accident?” We are getting to the edge of named numbers, except for Googol and googolplex. For all intents and purposes, adding the probability agianst coincidence for one more State will be adding an infinity to an infinity. at this point, numbers become meaningless.

Obviously, Connecticut has paid a terrible price for its failed experiment in gun control, beginning with $2,200,000,000 for each excess homicide, the cost of medial tratement resulting from gun control at a mean cost of $37,000 for each extra person shot or cut, the cost of disability and continuing medical care, the cost of goods disappeared, damaged or stolen, as well as the cost of extra security, added law enforcement,prosecution,prisons,and probation and parole.

The estimated cost of Connecticut’s gun control is a staggering $55,900,000,000 and climbing by the second. That is far too high a price for a nation to pay for a series of laws that only make matters worse.

It is time for Congress to do wht it is paid to do,and preempt all State and Federal gun laws that exceed current Federal gun restrictions, i institute a study of existing gun laws and forbid any laws modeled on failed gun laws; as well as impose a reasonable fine,at least $100,000 a day,on those who attempt to enforce preempted gun laws,or to craft new laws to evade Federal preemption.

Lives are too valuable to waste just because someone thinks it would be a good idea.

Stranger

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Colorado: The Cost Of Gun Control

Continuing the second “Cost of Gun Control” series with the next State in alphabetical order, Colorado, we will again see the State fit the profile of a gun control venue as the key dates and rates are noted.

As usual with this series, all crime numbers mentioned here are from the FBI Uniform Crime Report,either from the printed or internet editions,or from this spreadsheet, maintained by the Disaster Center.

There are multiple objects in this series, the primary one being to demonstrate that the universal increase in all forms of crime when restrictive gun laws cannot be a result of coincidence. Since each State has different income levels as well as different demographics, the probability that crime rates will rise and fall in lockstep immediately after imposing or repealing a restriive gun law are extremely remote. When you have hundreds of such “coincidences” crediting other factors than gun control becomes statistically impossible. A subject we will return to after we look at Colorado’s gun laws and crime numbers.

The key dates and violent crime rates are:

1960, the 27th year of a long term decline in crime following the repeal of Prohibition when the violent crime rate was 156.5 per 100,000 population.

1963,the year the entertainment industry began a nationwide gun ban campaign;when the crim rate was 1156.5 per 100,000 population.

1954,the first full year of Hollywood’s gun ban campaign, when the rime rate was 1,337.5.

1968, the full year of Hollywood’s gun ban campaign, and the year the Federal Gun Control Act of 1968 was imposed and the crime rate was 2,890.4/

1969, the first full year of Federal gun controls when the rate of crimes crimes reported to the police jumped to 3,225.5 per 100,000 population.

973, the fifth full year of Federal gun controls, which saw the crime rate soar to 3,664.4.

1992, the peak year for violent crime, when the “Assault Weapons Ban” campaign was at its height; and the crime total reported by the police was 5,052.9 per 100,000 population.

2013, when the State banned standard capacity magazines on many firearms including Sprt Utility Rifles:, when the violent crime rate was down to 305.4 per 100,000; thanks to the 1993 shift in gun purchases from sporting rifles and shotguns to handguns and other defensive weapons.

As you can see from the chart below, violent crime rates rose in 204, 2015, and from preliminary numbers, in 2016 as a result of new gun restrictions imposed in 2013.

At this point, let me point out that in 1960 only 48 percent of Colorado’s homicides were gun related, but by 1968 69.6 percent of the State’s homicides were gun related. A percentage that has fallen very little in 49 years.

For 2015, the last year for which we have FBI crime numbers, victims reported 72765 or one crime for every 50 Residents, a moderately low rate consistent with a largely rural State outside the Denver metro area. For 2015 Colorado reported 176 murders for a rate of 5.8 homicides per 100,000, and a firearms homicide rate of 3.8 per 100,000. 65.3 percent of homicides were firearms related, slightly below the national average.

With that, it is chart time, with a pre-chart note that media reports make it clear the small decline after 2012 is due to a decline in the number of teens “getting it on” over girls or the other things teens and young adults settle with fisticuffs: combined with increased population as the number of illegals and those fleeing California grow:

Colorado’s deomographics are atypical, comprising approximaely 80 percent Palefae, 15 percent Asians, Hispanics, and other low crime rte minorities, and les than five percent the mroe violent minorities.

Since that is the case, you can expect Colorado’s crime, violent crime, and homicide rates to be comparatively low, and the outside the Colorado Springs to Pueblo strip State does not disappoint.

Denver is quite violent, with a 2015 violent crime rate near 711 per 100,000 population; Colorado Springs came in at 431 violent crimes per 100,000; and Pueblo and Pueblo a staggering violent crime rate of 918.8, per 100,000 population.

Of course, homicide is a part of violent crime: and Colorado’s homicide rates also reflect the low preponderance of low violence demographic groups:

Like Colorado’s violent crime rates, Colorado’s murder totals have tracked the expected results of gun control campaigns and restrictive gun laws, starting in 1963. Since there has been little political pressure, and the State has become a hub for drug distribution, the decline in violent crime and homicide has not taken place. Instead, the constant pressure for more restrictive gun laws has driven violent crime rates up, as you can see at the right side of the homicide chart.

Obviously, Colorado has paid a terrible price for gun control, including thousands of homicides at an estimated cost of $2,200,000 each, the estimated $32,000 each cost of treating shooting victims, the cost of lost productivity, lost wages, and disability, lost companionship, the loss of parents, the cost of goods disappeared, damaged, or stolen, and the additional cost of security, Law Enforcement, prosecutions, prisons, and parole – to begin to list the additional costs incurred as a result of restrictive gun laws.

In Colorado’s case, the estimate of the dollar cost of gun control is $64,500,000,000, sixty four and a half billion, dollars since 1963. And that does not include the cost of intangibles such as loss of companionship.

Sixty for billion dollars is far too much to expect any State to pay for laws that do not reduce crime, do not make anyone safer, or do anything an informed person would consider good. Ad yet, there are politically pwerful people who think gun control will benefit them. Colorado’s ANTI-Party Governor Hickenlooper, for one.

It is time for Congress to do its duty and preempt all local and State gun restrictions on firearms more restrictive than Federal law, and to examine the results of every Federal law and regulation and repeal the counterproductive majority. And, because there are people like Hickenlooper, impose a reasonable penalty, at least $100,000 a day, on those attempting to enforce preempted legislation or to evade the limits imposed on local laws and ordinances.

Stranger

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California, The Cost Of Gun Control

California’s Bay Area is not “Chicago West just yet, but with a car to car shooting at least once a week they are beginning to call it that.

And with a total cost of more than a half trillion dollar cost for gun control since 1960, California has paid more for gun control than Illinois. So lets look at California, the bloody results of gun control, and the cost of crime to the once “Golden State.”

California is the fifth State and sixth review in our expanded series of the cost of gun control.
Arizona is the fifth entry in our 52 post series with the

While California joined the gun control brigade in 1907, a result of a striker slipping on a steam engine warming up for a run from San Bernardino to needles, escaping catastrophe when a “scab,” a strikebreaker” noticed a blown out boiler rivet,serous gun controls waited until 1967, when a blanket prohibition against loaded guns in public, even for CCW holders, was passed.

Here are the high points of gun control in California:

1976 saw a 15 day waiting period on all handgun purchases.

1990 saw the publication of a list of prohibited guns.

1991 aw a registration scheme, with all transfers handled by a State agency.

1994 saw the gun banners back with a firearms owners card system.

2000 saw an “Assault Weapons Ban.”

2001 saw publication of a list of guns approved for sale in Kali. Guns not on the list oculd not be legally transferred.

2005 brought a harassing bill, a ban on most .50 caliber firearms.

2006 Kali required both a Loaded Chamber Indicator and a magazine disconnector to be legal for sale in California.

2008 brought a harassing law, registering anyone who sells a gun to a dealer.

2011 Allowed taxes collected to exercise a Constitutional right to be blown by the Attorney General of CAlifornia.

2012 Harassing bill banned open carry of unloaded guns.

2012 Authorized Los Angeles County to pass its own gun laws.

2014 Long gun owner registration enacted.

2014 Acquisition of new or rebuilt magazines criminalized.

2014 Harassing law banning lead \bullets.

2014 Harassing law, replacing the Handgun safety card with a firearms safety card.

2015 Harassing law bans turning semi-autos into single shots.

216 Harassing law, adds “Gun Violence Restraing Orders” to Kali law.

With all that, and the many less obnoxious items I did not mention, if any place be free of firearms related crime it should be California.

So let’s look at the effect the post 1950 gun laws have had on violent crime in the State.

Before I begin the dates and numbers, let me point out that California has very non-typical demographics. Our most violent demographic group comprises just 6.4 percent of the population, half the national percentage, and while the charts list the state with average family income of $64,500 a year, That does not consider the vast gap between the affluent and the desperately poor.

With that, the key dates are 1960, before post-entertainment industry gun ban campaign began pushing up the crime numbers, 1963 when the entertainment industry began a national gun ban campaign, 1968, when that campaign paid off with two draconian State gun laws and the Federal Gun Control Act of 1968; 1973 wh the five full year point for the Gun Control Act of 1968, and 1993, the end year for the so-called Assault Weapons Ban campaign.

The numbers and rates 0here can be verified either at this convenient spreadsheet, or in the original printed copies of the FBI Uniform Crime Report kept on file at many police headquarters. And with that it is time to look at the numbers.

In 1960 California Law Enforcement Agencies reported violent crime rate of 239.0 violent crimes per 100,000 Californians.241.2

1963 the year the entertainment industry started a gun b an campaign, the rate was 241.2 per 100,000.

1964 , the first full year of a national gun ban campaign Arizona authorities reported a rate of 265.6 per 100,000 to the FBI.

1968, the fifth year of the first National gun ban campaign and 15 days of a Federal gun control law, the violent crime rate came in at 422.9 per 100,000 population.

1969, the first full year of year of Federal gun controls California’s violent crime rate shoot up to 462.9 per 100,000 population.

1973, the fifth full year of Federal gun controls saw California’s violent crime rate rose to 469.9.

And finally, the peak year for violent crime in California was was 11992, at the height of the Federal Assault Weapons Ban, with a violent crime rate of 1,119.7 per 100,000.

Even though California’s very low crime demographics and the very high economic factors, California’s gun control and gun owner harassing laws have kept the State’s violent crime rates far higher than the national rate until the present; as the cart below clearly indicates:

In reality, California’s violent crime situation is worse then official numbers suggest. An estimated 36 percent of crime victims are illegals who, fearing deportation, will not report being a crime victim to the police. That comment is based on prison surveys, and is informational, not part of the discussion here.

As you can see, even though Californians realized a gun ban was imminent and began buying defensive weapons in 1992, sharply reducing the violent crime rates, California’s draconian and often spiteful gun laws have kept the violent crime rates far above the national average.

Next, let us go to a key question. What are the chances that some other factor is responsible for these the increase and decrease in homicide and violent crime already noted?

As the investigators saying goes, “When everything else has been eliminated, what is left must be truth.” My friends and I have painstakingly gone through every feasible suggestion an for an alternative cause, and come up dry. Now, it was not adding tetraethyl lead to gasoline, that was don as early as 1929, and was nearly universal by 1933, the year relaxed enforcement of gun laws caused the violent crime rates to fall. Other suggested causes, such as demographic shits, and even mattress types have been investigated, and discarded. What remains are the restrictive gun laws that are shared by the f50 States and the District of Columbia.

But what is the probability that this pattern of increase in violent crime could be just a coincidence?

Each State’s violent crime rates consist of four parts; homicide/murder, rape,robbery, and “Aggravated Assault.” The probability that any State’s four crime rates would rise and fall in almost immediately after imposition of gun restrictions is remote, on the order of 3,000 to 15,000 to 1. Multiply that by the four violent crimes tracked by the FBI, and then multiply that by 1,500 again for each time a violent crime rate rises and falls as gun laws are made more or less restrictive and the probability that there is any other reason for the observed fluctuations is indeed minute.

So far, with just five states posted, the probability that gun control is the primary factor in the rise of violent crime is grater than one Decillion to one. In practical terms, that is infinite. One would have to be far beyond lucky to find a gun control law that has ever reduced crime, made anyone safer, or done anything else an ethical person would consider acceptable.

With that,let’s continue with the monetary cost of gun control by considering the cots the Golden State’s of gun control costs the people of Arizona, including cost of each additional homicide at $2.2 million each, as well as the cost of medical care, permanent disability, loss of income, loss of companionship, as well as he costs of destroyed, damaged or stolen goods, the additional cost of security, law enforcement, the criminal justice system, and the penal system. The total is staggering, as you can see by considering just the number of excess homicides above the 1963 base rate:

When all the costs are added, it comes to more than $42,500 per family for a total of $582,620,000,000 over 54 years.

And California’s lawmakers are trying their best to make the cost even higher.

Stranger

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Arizona: The Cost Of Gun Control

Well, let’s continue our series, fighting the spell checker all the way!

Arizona is the fifth entry in our 52 post series with the National cost of gun control since 1960, plus the States of Alabama, Alaska, and now Arkansas and now Arizona.

Each State has radically different incomes levels, its population has a different demographic mix of peoples, and of course different laws, imposed at different times. While Arkansas is no exception to that rule, as you will see the Wonder State3’s violent crime rates track the other 50 States,plus the District of Columbia, to an amazing degree. While factors not related to crime – the collapse of Black employment in Chicago had a profound effect on Arkansas violent crime rates, with very few exceptions those are quickly and easily explained.

Arizona likes on key human trafficking and smuggling routes from Mexico, creating conditions that should lead to an one of the United states higher sets of violent crime rates. Fortunately, the State has a relaxed attitude toward self defense which keeps the lid on the rime rates.

With that, let me note that Arizona’s reputation for violence is myth, not fact. For the most part, gunplay was between criminals or members of criminal groups, as in the notorious gunfight between the “Gamblers and the Rustlers,” known as the shootout at the OK Corral. And no, I will not cover that in this, or probably any,post here.

Restrictive gun laws came shortly after Statehood in 1912, and the rise in violent rime is a part of the rise in the national violent rime rate in 1912.

Arizona began issuing Concealed weapons results in 1994 with a salutory effect on violent rime, followed by Constitutional Carry in late 2009.

There are two key sets of number that are key to understanding just what gun control has done to Arizona, and what gun control has cost Arizona.

The key dates are 1960, before gun control was an issue, 1963 when the entertainment industry began a national gun ban campaign, 1968, when that campaign paid off with two draconian State gun laws and the Federal Gun Control Act of 1968; 1973 wh the five full year point for the Gun Control Act of 1968, and 1993, the end year for the so-called Assault Weapons Ban campaign.

The numbers and rates given here can either at this convenient spreadsheet, or in the original printed copies of the FBI Uniform Crime Report kept on file at many police headquarters. And with that it is time to look at the numbers.

Because Arizona’s population has grown from `,300,000 in 1960 to an estimated 6,900,000 in 2015,the for clarity the following are the violent crime RATE is given in crimes per 100,000 population.

In 1960 Arizona Law Enforcement Agencies reported violent crime rate of 2017.7 per 100,000.

1963 the year the entertainment industry started a gun b an campaign, the rate was 194.2..

1954, the first full year of a national gun ban campaign Arizona authorities reported a rate of 213.0 to the FBI.

1968, the fifth year of the first National gun ban campaign and 15 days of a Federal gun control law, the violent crime rate was up to 238.2,

1969, the first full year of year of Federal gun controls sa Arizona’s violent crime rate shoot up to 339.2 per 100,000 population.
A
1973, the fifth full year of Federal gun controls saw Arizona’s violent crime rate rose to 479.9.

And finally, the peak year for violent crime in Arkansas was 1993, the year before Arizona began licensing Concealed Carry, when Arizona authorities reported 28,142 violent crimes to the FBI for a violent crime rate of 715.0 per 100,000 population.

With that,it is time to look at Arizona’s violent crime rate in chart form:

As you can see, Arizona’s violent crime rates began falling almost as soon as the Legislature approved Concealed Carry Weapon Permits. A topic we shall return to presently.

Now, let us go to a key question. What are the chances that some other factor is responsible for these the increase and decrease in homicide and violent crime already noted?

As the investigators saying goes, “When everything else has been eliminated, what is left must be truth.” My friends and I have painstakingly gone through every feasible suggestion an for an alternative cause, and come up dry. Now, it was not adding tetraethyl lead to gasoline, that was don as early as 1929, and was nearly universal by 1933, the year relaxed enforcement of gun laws caused the violent crime rates to fall. Other suggested causes, such as demographic shits, and even mattress types have been investigated, and discarded. What remains are the restrictive gun laws that are shared by the f50 States and the District.

But what is the probability that this pattern of increase in violent crime could be just a coincidence?

Each State’s violent crime rates consist of four parts; homicide/murder, rape,robbery, and “Aggravated Assault. the probability that any State’s four crime rates would rise and fall in almost immediately after imposition of gun restrictions is remote, on the order of 3,000 to 15,000 1,500 to 1. Multiply that by the four violent crimes tracked by the FBI, and then multiply that by 1,500 again for each time a violent crime rate rises and falls as gun laws are made more or less restrictive and the probability that there is any other reason for the observed fluctuations is indeed minute.

So far, with just three states posted, the probability that gun control is the primary factor in the ries of violent crime is grater than one trillion to one.

With that,let’s continue with the monetary cost of gun control by considering the cots the Grand Canyon State’s of gun control costs the people of Arizona, including cost of each additional homicide at %2.2 million each, as well as the cost of medical care, permanent disability, loss of income, loss of companionship, as well as he costs of destroyed, damaged or stolen goods, the additional cost of security, law enforcement, the criminal justice system, and the penal system. The total is staggering, as you can see by considering just the number of excess homicides above the 1963 base rate:

When all the costs are added, it comes to more than $10,650,000,000.

While Arizona is a relatively affluent State,no State regardless of wealth can afford such a cost. A cost foredoomed to be a useless expenditure, because no gun control in history has ever reduced crime, made anyone safer, or reduced the incidence of political assassinations; a record of failure without equal in history.

While we are less than ten percent of the way through the States, his pattern will be repeated, with minor variations, all the way to Wyoming!

It is time to say “Enough” to laws that drive violent crime rtes sky high and preempt every restrictive State and Local gun law; and impowse a reasonable find for anyone who attempts enforce preempted laws, or crate new laws to evade preemption.

Stranger

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Arkansas: The Cost Of Gun Control

Arkansas is the fourth State in our 52 post serious with the National cost of gun control since 1960, plus the States of Alabama, Alaska, and now Arkansas.

Each State has radically different incomes levels, its population has a different demographic mix of peoples, and of course different laws, imposed at different times. While Arkansas is no exception to that rule, as you will see the Wonder State3’s violent crime rates track the other 50 States,plus the District of Columb ia, to an amazing degree. While factors not related to crime – the collapse of Black employment in Chicago had a profound effect on Arkansas violent crime rates, with very few exceptions those are quickly and easily explained.

There are two key sets of number here, dates, and the percentage of increase in crime after imposition of a restrictive local, State, or Federal gun law.

The key dates are 1960, when the Defauver Commission wa hot on the trail of those who contemplated imposing Federal gun controls: 1963 when the entertainment industry began a national gun ban campaign, 1968, when that campaign paid off with two draconian State gun laws and the Federal Gun Control Act of 1968; 1973 wh the five full year point for the Gun Control Act of 1968, and 1993, the end year for the so-called Assault Weapons Ban campaign.

The numbers and rates given here can either at this convenient spreadsheet, or in the original printed copies of the FBI Uniform Crime Report kept on file at many police headquarters. And with that it is time to look at the numbers.

In the late 1950’s the job for unskilled and semi-skilled labor in the Chicago area had collapsed, with Black unemployment rose from below 3 percent to more than 11 percent, and many Black Arkies moved b ack to Marvell, Cotton Plant, Piggot,Stuttgart, Lake Village, and all points in between. With that note…

In 1960 Arkansas violent Law Enforcement Agencies reported 1,924 violent crimes to the FBI.

1963 saw 1,6987 violent crimes reorted to the FBI.

1954, the first full year of a national gun ban campaign s Arkansas LEA’s report 1,994 violnet crimes to the FBI.

1968, the fifth year of the first National gun ban campaign saw 4,360 violent crimes reported to the FBI.

1969, the first full year of year of Fedral gun controls saw Arkansas LEA’s report 4,390 violent crimes to the FBI.

1973, the fifth full year of Federal gun controls saw Arkansas LEA’s report 5,906 violent rimes to the FBI.

And finally, the peak year for violent crime in Arkansas was 1995, when low skill jobs started going “offshore,” and Arkansas LEA’s reported 14,598 violent crimes to the FBI. The The chart below show violent crime rates soared under the influence of State and local gun control laws:

Changing the topic slightly, What are the chances that some other factor is responsible for these the increase in homicide and violent crime already noted?

As the investigators saying goes, “When everything else has been eliminated, what is left must be truth.” My friends and I have painstakingly gone through every feasible suggestion an for an alternative cause, and come up dry. Now, it was not adding tetraethyl lead to gasoline, that was don as early as 1929, and was nearly universal by 1933, the year relaxed enforcement of gun laws caused the violent crime rates to fall. Other suggested causes, such as demographic shits, and even mattress types have been investigated, and discarded. What remains are the restrictive gun laws that are shared by the f50 States and thge District.

But what is the probability that this pattern of increase in vioelnt crime could be just a coincidence?

Each State’s violent crime rates consist of four parts; homicide/murder, rape,robbery, and “Aggravated Assault. the probability that any STate’s four crime rates would rise and fall in almost immediately after imposition of gun restrictions is remote, on the order of 3,000 to 15,000 1,500 to 1. Multiply that by the four violent crimes tracked by the FBI, and then multiply that by 1,500 again for each time a violent crime rate rises and falls as gun laws are made more or less restrictive and the probability that there is any other reson for the observed fluctuations is indeed minute.

So far, with just three states posted, the probability that gun control is the primary factor in the ries of violent crime is grater than one trillion to one.

With that,let’s continue by considering the cotst Wonder State’s of gun control costs the people of Arkansas. As you can see by comparing Arkansas homicide rate to the rte for other STates, they track quite closely, especially considering Arkansas is a hideout fr criminals frim th e Memphis, Shreveport, and St. Louis areas:

Turning to the cost of gun control, The current estimate of the cost of gun control since 1960, starting with the number of excess lives lost, medial care and treatment for the wounded and disabled, the cost of disability, lost companionship, lost wages, goods destroyed, damaged or stolen, the extra costs of so law enforcement and other coss total a staggering $68,000,000,00, sixty eight billion dollars.

Obviously, my friends in the Wonder STate, from McGhee and Dumas to Siloam Springs and Gravette; from Rector and Piggot to Texarkana,have paid an enormous price in lives, suffering, and treasure for the gun control fable.

It is time to say “Enough” to laws that drive violent crime rtes sky high and preempt every restrictive State and Local gun law; and impowse a reasonable find for anyone who attempts enforce preempted laws, or crate new laws to evade preemption.

Stranger

This report cross posted at Extranos Alley

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Alaska: The cost Of Gun Control

While we have had regularly enforced gun laws since 1865, it was not until 1905 that those laws impacted an Americans right to purchase,own,or carry a gun. Most of the restrictive gun laws were “time and place laws, generally observed as a part of civilized behavior. Such laws are not considred in this discussion of the cost of gun control.

This post will look more closely at the effect and cost of gun control in our largest State, Alaska. The effects of gun controls – and permissive gun laws – \have been profound, and should be much better known and appreciated than is the case. In particular, the

Homicide rates give a much more limited picture, which we will discuss presently.For the moment, let’s look at Alabama’s violent crime rates.

The key dates are 1960,after a 27 year long decline n violent crime rates brought on by relaxed enforcement of restrictive gun laws after Prohibition:

1963, the year the entertainment industry began a nationwide gun ban campaign in response to peer reviewed scientific studies demonstrating a causal link between television violence and societal violence:

1964, the first full year of the first nationwide gun ban campaign:

1968; the fifth full year of a gun ban campaign, the year Hollywood got two very restrictive State gun laws and the Federal Gun Control Act of 1968:

1969, the first full year of dra State level gun restrictions the Greek tyrranos Draco would be proud of, and Federal gun controls:

1973, the fifth year of Federal gun controls; and..

1993,the final year of the “Assault Weapons Ban” campaign.

And the results of the gun control campaign and resultant violent crime wave are shown in the chart below. These numbers can be verified in the back issues of the FBI Uniform Crime Report, or in his convenient spreadsheet, maintaned by he Disaster Center.

You can easily see the effect of both gun ban campaigns and restrictive gun laws as well as economics, in the chart above. here is the hihgh homicide rate in the early 1960’s as drug wars over turf took lives. There is the reaction to the Gun Control Act of 1968, leading to a \first peak in 1976, followed by a decline as conditions improved somewhat and then a second peak in 1992,and a sharp decline as many of Alabama’s criminals decided the easy lifestyle was not worth the risk.

In the next 50 “Cost” posts you will see this pattern repeated. Not exactly – because the demographics and economics of each State are different, as well as the difference in how stringent the gun laws are and how vigorously they are enforced.

In 1960 American Law Enforcement agencies reported 288,288,460 violent crimes, murders, rapes,robberies, and aggravated assaults to the FBI.

In 1963, with a somewhat larger population, local LEA’s reported 316,970 such crimes.

In 1964,the first full year of a gun ban campaign, LEA’s reported 364,220 such crimes.

In 1968,the fifth year of Hollywood’s gun ban and the first two weeks of the Gun Control Act of 1968campaign American LEA’s reported 595,010 violent crimes to the FBI..

1969 was the first full year of Federal, and two State,gun control laws, and local LEA’s reported 61,870 violent crimes to the FBI.

1973 was the fifth full year of Federal gun controls, and local Law Enforcement Agencies reported 875.910 violent crimes to the FBI. 1993 was the peak of the campaign to ban so-called “assault weapons,” a rifle used far more ofte by police SWAT teams than by civilians with harm on their minds.

I993 marked a turning point, as relaxed gun laws and general realization that our masters in Washington intended to disarm Americans started a wave of gun purchases. In the next few months, more than 200 million new guns have been purchased, cutting violent crime from 758.1 violent crimes including 9.5 murders per 100,000 in 1993 to to 379.12 violent crimes and 4.5 homicides per 100,000 in 2013.

That is when the latest gun control campaign began doing what gun control ampaigns have invariably done,drive up the crime rate. If you refer to the upper,homicide,chart, the red columns at the right side of the chart shows the effect the effect relaxing gun laws have on the homicide rate. As usual, the numbers can be verified with back issues of the FBI Uniform Crime report or by the Disaster Center’s convenient spreadsheet:

The relatively small population and weather and economic factors produced the high extremely variable homicide rate that was prevalent before the late 199o.s The homicide rate has been much lower since Constitutional Carry, concealed carry without a permit, was allowed. After that, the violent crime and homicide rates stabilized until the arrival of large quantities of gun control activists. The results of that lot easily be seen on the right side of the homicide chart.

THE OVERVIEW

Since the entertainment industry began its 1963 gun control campaign, the total cost of gun control to Alaska has exceeded $750,000,000 seven hundred fifty million dollars,well over $17,000 for every living Alaskan.

As you can ee, Alaska a has paid a terrible price in lives,property,and treasure for State and Federal gun controls. From 1963 to 2015,that cost is estimated at more than $17,000 for every living Alaskan, a far greater cost than any state,

That is a terrible load, even for America’s \third most prosperous State. And it is a load that is increasing as gun control propagandists to drive Alaska’s murder and robbery rates sky high.

Stranger

Stranger

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Alabama, The Cost Of Gun Control

While we have had regularly enforced gun laws since 1865, it was not until 1905 that those laws impacted an Americans right to purchase,own,or carry a gun. Most of the restrictive gun laws were “time and place laws, generally observed as a part of civilized behavior. Such laws are not considred in this discussion of the cost of gun control.

Labor problems were the proximate cause of the restrictive laws imposed in the 1905-06 period, as workers demands for bettre wages and working ocnditions clashed with the determined opp;osition of mine,mill,and factory owners not to give an inch. The resutlt were many armed clashes between striking workers and the company’s hired “strikebreakers,called scabs.

The immediate result was a near vertical increase in murder and violent crime rates, particularly assault. It was not unusual for workers walking a picket line to be jeered by scabs patrolling the fence, and violence often resulted.

A very similar pattern appeared in the crime rates during the 1960’s, particularly in the violent crime rates that give a snapshot of the overall victimization rate in a nation, state, or community.

Homicide rates give a much more limited picture, which we will discuss presently.For the moment, let’s look at Alabama’s violent crime rates.

The key dates are 1960,after a 27 year long decline n violent crime rates brought on by relaxed enforcement of restrictive gun laws after Prohibition:

1963, the year the entertainment industry began a nationwide gun ban campaign in response to peer reviewed scientific studies demonstrating a causal link between television violence and societal violence:

1964, the first full year of the first nationwide gun ban campaign:

1968; the fifth full year of a gun ban campaign, the year Hollywood got two very restrictive State gun laws and the Federal Gun Control Act of 1968:

1969, the first full year of dra State level gun restrictions the Greek tyrranos Draco would be proud of, and fFederal gun controls:

1973, the fifth year of Federal gun controls; and..

1993,the final year of the “Assault Weapons Ban” campaign.

And the results of the gun control campaign and resultant violent crime wave are shown in the chart below. These numbers can be verified in the back issues of the FBI Uniform Crime Report, or in his convenient spreadsheet, maintaned by he Disaster Center.

Largely rural, bogged in poverty,and subject to the outrageous risks of farming,Alabama was slow to respond to Hollywood’s gun ban campaign, and to the Federal gun controls that followed.

In 1960 Alab ama Law Enforcement Agencies reported 6,097 violent crimes to the FBI, out of a population of 2,267,000.

In 1963, Alabama LEA’s reported 6,115 duch crimes to the FBI.

In 1964, authorities reorted 7,260 violent crimes to the FBI.

1968, the year that saw the entertainment industry’s gun ban camp;aign pay off, Alabama’s LEA’s rep;orted 8,288 violent crimes to the FBI.

in 1969, the first full yer of Federal gun controls, Alabama authorities reported 12,390 murders,rapes,robberies and aggravated assaults to the FBI.

The peak year for violent crime was 1992, when Alabama LEA’s reported 3232676 violent crimes to the FBI. That reflects Alabamians early awareness that they could lose their gun rights, and a shift from purchases of sporting arms, rifles and shotguns, to defensive weapons.

So it is time for a a chart of Alabama’s violent crimes

You can easily see the effect of both gun ban campaigns and restrictive gun laws as well as economics, in the chart above. here is the hihgh homicide rate in the early 1960’s as drug wars over turf took lives. There is the reaction to the Gun Control Act of 1968, leading to a \first peak in 1976, followed by a decline as conditions improved somewhat and then a second peak in 1992,and a sharp decline as many of Alabama’s criminals decided the easy lifestyle was not worth the risk.

In the next 50 “Cost” posts you will see this pattern repeated. Not exactly – because the demographics and economics of each State are different, as well as the difference in how stringent the gun laws are and how vigorously they are enforced.

But for the moment, since this series is alphabetical,it will be “North to Alaska.”

Stranger

In 1960 American Law Enforcement agencies reported 288,288,460 violent crimes, murders, rapes,robberies, and aggravated assaults to the FBI.

In 1963, with a somewhat larger population, local LEA’s reported 316,970 such crimes.

In 1964,the first full year of a gun ban campaign, LEA’s reported 364,220 such crimes.

In 1968,the fifth year of Hollywood’s gun ban and the first two weeks of the Gun Control Act of 1968campaign American LEA’s reported 595,010 violent crimes to the FBI..

1969 was the first full year of Federal, and two State,gun control laws, and local LEA’s reported 61,870 violent crimes to the FBI.

1973 was the fifth full year of Federal gun controls, and local Law Enforcement Agencies reported 875.910 violent crimes to the FBI. 1993 was the peak of the campaign to ban so-called “assault weapons,” a rifle used far more ofte by police SWAT teams than by civilians with harm on their minds.

I993 marked a turning point, as relaxed gun laws and general realization that our masters in Washington intended to disarm Americans started a wave of gun purchases. In the next few months, more than 200 million new guns have been purchased, cutting violent crime from 758.1 violent crimes including 9.5 murders per 100,000 in 1993 to to 379.12 violent crimes and 4.5 homicides per 100,000 in 2013.

That is when the latest gun control campaign began doing what gun control ampaigns have invariably done,drive up the crime rate. If you refer to the upper,homicide,chart, the red columns at the right side of the chart shows the effect the latest gun control drives have had on the murder rate/

Since the entertainment industry began its 1963 gun control campaign in 1963, the total cost of gun control has exceeded $4,200,000,000.00,$4.2 trillion,equivalent to $16,000 for every living American and more than$37,000 for every current American
household.

As you can ee, Alabama has paid a terrible price in lives,property,and treasure for Federal gun controls. From 1963 to 2015,that cost is estimated at $7,000,000,000,seven billion, dollars.Costs include lives lost,medical treatment,permanent disability,loss of companionship,loss of a parent,property lost,destroyed,or damaged; as well as the extra costs of security, law enforcement, and incarceration.

That is a terrible load for a poor State to be forced to carry.It is time for Congress to behave like adults and preempt all State gun laws, bringing them back to no more than the restriction level America had before gun controls.

Watch for the 50 posts showing in detail what gun cotnrl did to your State, and to every State.

Stranger

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